Archive for: ‘May 2019’

Bang for your buck: Sale of old bricks raises money for Sunflower House

17/05/2019 Posted by admin

GOOD CAUSE: Jenny Mountford with some of the old jail wall bricks for sale at $10 each, with money going to Sunflower House. Picture: Michael Frogley
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SOME people want to use them to build a barbecue.

Others have bought them as “secret Santa” gifts.

And then there are the history buffs who just want to own a piece of Wagga’s past.

The one thing in common among people who have bought bricks from a demolished old Wagga jail wall is their money is going to a great cause – Sunflower House.

The wall has come down to make way for a $17 million redevelopment of the Wagga court precinct.

Wagga court deputy registrar Jenny Mountford said 50 bricks out of the 300 on offer had been sold since last week.

The bricks, estimated to be more than 100 years old, cost $10 each and come with a numbered certificate of authenticity.

“We are doing quite well,” Ms Mountford said of sales so far.

“It’s generated lots of interest from people who want to how about the history of the court house.

“One person bought seven as a secret Santa gift.

“One fellow wants 20 for a barbecue.

“It would be terrific if we could sell all 300.”

Ms Mountford said Sunflower House was “thrilled to bits” with the brick initiative because the donated money – hopefully $3000 – will be donated with no strings attached.

Sunflower House team leader Mary McKenzie described the brick sale as a wonderful initiative.

She said Sunflower House – which assists people with a mental illness – was extending its kitchen, and the money might go towards that project.

She said Sunflower House was also looking to raise money to help retain a part-time staff member who works three days a week.

Bricks can be bought from the court office at 49 Fitzmaurice Street.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Newcastle earthquake: 25 years onPHOTOS

17/05/2019 Posted by admin

THE WORKER CLUB: A couple of poker machines are still standing amid the destruction as a worker inspects the damage.Constable Bob Williams and Sergeant Syd Goodliff were on routine patrol along Beaumont Street, Hamilton when “everything started to explode” with walls and awnings crashing down on shoppers.
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Frightened shoppers ran into the street, some screaming and crying, others wandered around dazed.

Several people were partially buried, others were digging under rubble with their hands to free the unlucky ones.

“All of a sudden everything was falling down everywhere, some partially buried,” Constable Williams said.

“Half a dozen people started to throw rubble off. Then everyone was digging in a mad panic to try to get people out.”

The two police officers joined with others in a frantic attempt to pull people from the rubble.

Newcastle earthquake: 25 years on | PHOTOS The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

The earthquake hit Newcastle on December 28, 1989, at 10.27am.

TweetFacebookAlbert Gavin Bender, 75, Merewether. Killed in the rubble of the Newcastle Workers Club.Dulcie Alice Bliim, 78, Hamilton. Killed under a collapsed wall in Beaumont Street while shopping for a dress.Carol Anne Coxhell, 49, Adamstown Heights. Killed while filling poker machines at Newcastle Workers Club.Miriam Coleen Duffy, 62, Whitebridge. Killed in the collapse of Newcastle Workers Club.Cyril Keith McMahon, 62, Hamilton. Killed under a collapsing wall in Beaumont Street, Hamilton.Verlina Maree March, 53, Carrington. Killed while playing poker machines at Newcastle Workers Club.Leonard Charles Norris, 60, Newcastle. Killed in the basement of the workers club where he was visiting a friend.Barry Francis Spark, 60, Mayfield. Killed in the basement maintenance room at the workers club.Peggy Theresa Stone, 75, Thornton. Killed inside the workers club where she had gone for her weekly hoi game.Eileen Mary Werren, 69, Mayfield West. Killed at the workers club, where she had gone to renew her membership.John Anthony O’Shanassy, 30, Sydney. A rock band roadie killedsetting up for a Split Enz concert at the workers club that night.Levener Georgia Watson, 63, Blackalls Park. Died the next day from a brain haemorrhage bought on by the stress of the earthquake.Cecil Robert Abbott, 59, Hamilton. Killed by a falling awning as he stopped for a chat outside the Kent Hotel.This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

WWI in the Herald: December 17, 1914

17/05/2019 Posted by admin

WWI in the Herald: Archive
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THURSDAY 17 DECEMBER 1914

Lord Cromer states that the defection of the Khedive is of no great political importance, as his personal influence in Egypt is slight. But, he adds, he must cease to be a ruler, and Egypt, as a result of the war, must be freed wholly and irrevocably from the pernicious mortmain of Turkish sovereignty.

Lord Cromer was for several years British Plenipotentiary in Egypt, and understands thoroughly the political, racial, and religious questions which affect that country.

It has nominally been under Turkish suzerainty for many years past, although at one time that was suspended and gave way to Anglo-French control. Since then it has come practically under British tutelage.

At the same time British rule has done much for the defence of Egypt. Britain has also conquered the Soudan and established fine cities, prosperous agricultural settlements, and a happy and free people.

That great work was due in the main to Lord Kitchener, the man who is now conducting Britain’s war for the defence and freedom of a brave European people.

Lord Kitchener not only freed the Soudanese from the murderous attacks of their enemies, but he finally broke the power of the Arabs, whose bloodthirsty rule had rendered the Soudan a plague spot on the earth, and who sold its people into slavery, and its women to worse than slavery.

Today the Soudan, from Khartoum to the Nile, is free and true to British rule. In Egypt the British have done much to help the advancement of what should be a great country.

Not only have they set the finances in order and vastly increased the productions of Egypt by the intelligent scientific use of the flood waters of the Nile, but they have put a stop to all the abuses which existed under Asiatic rule.

The population of Egypt is a mixed one, but under British rule religion has been free. They have also instilled a new spirit into methods of education.

This must work slowly among a people which has for the most part been uncultivated and ignorant for long centuries. But still the work is being accomplished, and it will go on developing every year. The higher class of Egyptians are of course well educated.

Many have added a continental training to their home culture, and their statesmen are men of ability.

The consensus of opinion in Egypt today would be against any relaxation of the British oversight.

There are two classes which are against it.

The first are the politicians who seek self-advancement, and the second men who are led by the Turks and others to regard British rule as grasping monopoly. These classes will always be found in any country under foreign control.

If the Khedive is officially made to relinquish his throne as he has already done by his action in fighting against the British, the question will arise as to what is to be the future of Egypt.

Wholly apart from other questions, there is the paramount importance of maintaining the integrity of the Suez Canal. Britain and France are mainly interested in this.

That the war will ultimately lead to the annexation of Syria, whether by Britain or France, is now almost a certainty.

But Egypt itself will in all probability not see the rule of another Khedive. Whether it shall become wholly British or be ruled by a Government under the benevolent suzerainty of Britain remains to be seen.

But when the war is over there will be only three Powers who will have a voice in settling the future of Egypt.

These will be Britain, France, and Russia. Neither of the two latter will raise the least objection to Britain pursuing whatever policy she may deem best in the interests of Egypt. And the chances are that another fine country will be added to the dominions of the British Empire.

It will not be without some satisfaction to Australia in the years to come to remember that her troops, now encamped under the shadow of the Pyramids near Memphis, will have played their part in this historic change.

Paris, Wednesday.

The latest communique states:-

“The French and Belgians at Nieuport have occupied a line westward of Lombaertsyde to Saint Georges.

The Allies advanced 500 metres south of Ypres towards Klemzillebeke.

A previous communique stated:- “The British have captured a small wood west of Wyteschaete. We retained the ground won on the Ypres west of Hollebeke, notwithstanding a vigorous counter attack.

We made progress in the Argonne.

The enemy violently bombarded Saint Leonard, south of Saint Die.

The enemy’s artillery in Alsace is very active. We held our ground, except at Steinbach, where the German infantry gained a footing.

The Official Press Bureau reports that, after a period of quiet, fighting has been recommenced in northern France.

The Allies made a combined attack on Monday from Hollebeke to Wyteschaete, and captured several trenches and a number of prisoners.

Substantial progress was made.

London, Wednesday.

The Dunkirk correspondent of the London “Dally Chronicle” states that the desperate three days battle at Ypres began with the German bombardment of Saint Eloi.

The Allies replied with heavy artillery, taking cover of which the infantry advanced to Moorslade, where they met with determined resistance.

The Germans were concealed in armoured trucks in the railway sidings, from whence they directed heavy machine gun and rifle fire, forcing the Allies to retire and reform.

Simultaneously the Germans advanced through wooded country near Zonnebeke, and were checked by the Allies’ forces posted on the heights of Cheluvelt. Thereupon a general allied advance took place, and they regained Moorslade .

The artillery, locating the armoured trains, exploded the ammunition, and the enemy retreated, leaving the road to Roulers open.

In the meantime other Germans attacked Pouecapelle, Passchendaele, Langemarck, and Sexschoote. The enemy were trying in weight of numbers to break the line, but nowhere succeeded. There was much hand-to-hand fighting, and the casualties were estimated at 24,000.

The line of battle was a few kilometres long north and south of Ypres.

London, Wednesday.

The War Office announces that no further voluntary hospitals whatever are required at present for the British expeditionary force in France.

Any voluntary hospitals now on the Continent or hereafter proceeding there must work as base hospitals.

Cairo, Tuesday.

The Australian encampment behind the Pyramids of. Cheops and Chephren is a wonderful sight.

There are miles of white tents, intersected by streets. Thousands of white pebbles have been arranged as emblems.

The Government is erecting booths for cafes and shops.

Admiring crowds visit the camp, and watch the men and horses exercising.

Washington, Tuesday.

The Navy Department has learned officially of the arrival at Guam of the German converted cruiser Cormoran, 1614 tons.

The commander of the Cormoran was notified by the United States harbour authorities that he must leave within 24 hours, or be interned.

As it is improbable that the cruiser will be able to secure sufficient coal to take her to the nearest German port, she will probably be interned.

The Cormoran’s whereabouts have been unknown since she left Kiao-Chau.

A later message states that the Cormoran has decided to be interned.

Melbourne, Wednesday.

The following message has been received from the Secretary of State for the Colonies:-

After comparative quiet, fighting has recommenced in Northern France.

Yesterday the Allies made a combined attack on the line Hollebeke-Woteschaete, making substantial progress. Several German trenches were captured and numerous prisoners were taken.

The French Government reports some progress in the Argonne and Woevre districts and in Alsace.

Melbourne, Wednesday.

Senator Pearce, the Minister for Defence, has decided, in view of the destruction of the German Pacific fleet, to reduce the strength of the garrisons guarding the ports and costs of the Commonwealth.

Melbourne, Wednesday.

Instructions relative to the internment and treatment of alien enemies, which have been laid before the Federal Houses, include the following provisions:-

Points to which the attention of censors should be specially directed, being some of the methods by which attempts are being made to evade censorship, include:-

1. Writing inside envelopes and covers.

2. Apparently harmless, but unintelligible, marks or signs inside envelopes and covers.

3. Writing in faint pencil across or between the lines of letters written in ink.

4. Writing underneath postage stamps.

5. Underlining of phrases, words, or letters, which can then be read in a pre-arranged order.

6. Writing in “chemical ink,” which may be revealed by heating in an oven, or with an iron, or by the application of petrol.

Where prisoners of war are interned in a manoeuvre area, and it is found practicable to utilise their services for carrying out improvements in that area, they may be paid at the rate of 1s for each day’s work actually done, as pocket money.

The wives of detained prisoners of war, who are in destitute circumstances, may be paid at the rate of 10s a week, with the addition of 2s 6d a week for each child under 14 years of age.

Officers of the detained enemies’ vessels, if allowed to live outside and apart from the interned prisoners of war, may be granted an allowance for their upkeep at a rate not exceeding the sum of 20s a week each.

Where a number of these officers are domiciled in the one house, an allowance of 15s a week may be granted to the necessary cooks and stewards who accompany their officers. The number of cooks and stewards so employed is to be limited by the district commandant.

Brisbane, Wednesday.

Captain Mortimer, of the steamer Montoro, which arrived in Brisbane today from Singapore, stated that the Montoro met a steamer which had just returned from the scene of the destruction of the Emden, having gone there in response to a wireless message.

She reached the island about three days after the fight. It was found impossible to get near the scene, owing to a terrible stench of corpses which littered the crumpled decks of the Emden. At that time no attempt had been made to dispose of the bodies.

According to stories of eye witnesses, the Emden was battered beyond recognition.

The collier which accompanied the Emden was scuttled by the Germans, and sunk with a thousand tons of coal.

Some of the officers of the Emden are interned at Kuala Lumpur.

Brisbane, Wednesday.

The inquiry into the alleged mutiny on board the troopship Kanowna, when the vessel was on her way back from Port Moresby, was continued today.

Walter Rowlands, a fireman, gave evidence to the effect that, coming on deck on the conclusion of their watch, five firemen forming the watch found there was no water in the washhouse. They saw the captain, from whom, however, they got no satisfaction. One of the men observed that if the men could get no water they could not work. The captain ordered the men off the bridge, but they were subsequently brought back, and were taken down to their quarters, and placed in confinement for mutiny.

Corroborative evidence was given by other firemen.

The inquiry was adjourned until to tomorrow.

(From Embarkation Rolls)

Private Jeremiah James Dwyer, Maitland, 2nd Australian Light Horse Regiment, 5th Reinforceme

Austinmer ocean pool reopens

17/05/2019 Posted by admin

Early morning swimmers wasted no time plunging back into the reopened Austinmer pools. Picture: KIRK GILMOURAustinmer’sfamous ocean pool has reopened – but visitors may encounter some heavy duty hazard warning signs on their way to the water.
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Wollongong City Council has scrambled to make the pool available for the busiest period of the year, as locals and hundreds of visitors from Sydney descend on the popular spot for a day in the water.

‘‘Council is completing works today to make the pools as safe as possible for swimming over the summer period,’’ he said on Monday.

‘‘Council erected new signs to ensure the public was aware of the dangers involved in swimming in the pools with works only partially complete.’’

The signs do not hold back, warning swimmers that there are hazards that ‘‘could result in injury or death’’.

That may be the case, but the pool is in significantly better shape than when the council’s former contractor left the job late last month.

Brian Cummins from the Austinmer Early Morning Swimming Club said he and other early morning swimmers were happy with council’s quick action in having thepool reopened.

Brian Cummins updates the notice board at Austinmer pools. Picture: KIRK GILMOUR

“We are really pleased council realised how importantfor the community the pool is,” Mr Cummins said.

“It has swimmers from as early as 5am and I’d say up to 30 swimmers would use it prior to 10am.

“Everyone is really pleased to see the pool reopened, especially in time for the holiday break.”

The council was forced to take action after its contractor, Specialised Marine Services, went into voluntary liquidation after receiving more than $500,000 of ratepayers’ money, with the renovation job on the pools far from complete.

Since late last month, when SMS left the job with its equipment, the council first used its own workers to make the site safer, then employed local company Affective Services to get the pool to a standard where it could be used over summer.

Work will resume on the renovation project next year, after council members voted to allow general manager David Farmer to find a company to complete the work without going through the usual tender process.

The remaining work is expected to cost at least another $200,000.

The original tender was for just under half a million dollars.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

No bail application by Coota teen accused of stealing firearms

17/05/2019 Posted by admin

ONE of two men accused of breaking into a farm and stealing nine firearms will spend Christmas behind bars thinking about a bail application in the new year.
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Thomas Dowell, 19, faced bail court in Wagga for a second time on Mondayafter his arrest on December 17.

A bail application was expected, but Dowell’s solicitor PC Reddy told the registrar he would make further inquiries into the matter and make a bail application on January 5, the first sittings of Wagga Local Court in 2015.

Dowell, of Cootamundra, is charged with aggravated break, enter and commit a serious indictable offence, possessing an unauthorised firearm, possessing ammunition without a permit and not keeping a firearm safely.

Police allege Dowell and a 24-year-old Cootamundra man broke into a farm house on Back Brawlin Road sometime between November 24 and December 12.

It is alleged they found a set of gun safe cabinet keys in the house and then went to a shed, breaking in and then using the keys to unlock the safe and steal firearms and ammunition.

The firearms allegedly taken by the pair include four shotguns.

Police allege one of the firearms was found at a Cootamundra house when officers were investigating a domestic violence complaint on the morning of December 17.

A 38-year-old man at the house was charged with possessing an unauthorised firearm, not keeping a firearm safely, having goods suspected of being stolen and intimidation (domestic violence).

He was granted police bail to the January 5 sittings of Cootamundra Local Court.

Police allege investigations stemming from that incident led them to another house where they inspected a gun safe belonging to the 24-year-old man’s father.

It is alleged more of the stolen firearms were found in the safe.

The 24-year-old was arrested, interviewed and charged.

Dowell was arrested a few hours later.

The 24-year-old has been charged with aggravated break, enter and steal, four counts of possessing an unauthorised firearm and one count of possessing an unauthorised prohibited firearm.

He is also on police bail and will face Cootamundra Local Court on January 5.

Police say five of the nine stolen weapons have been recovered.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.